Course Registration Winter 2019

Winter Term
January 7, 2019 - February 28, 2019

8 Sessions Unless Otherwise Stated
Conference Room (18 Students)
Room 1 (80 Students)
Room 2 (40 Students)
Room 4 (18 Students)

Instructions

PLEASE FOLLOW THESE IMPORTANT INSTRUCTIONS TO REGISTER SUCCESSFULLY:

  1. We expect very heavy registration activity at the beginning of winter registration. You may not be able to register until traffic clears. Please keep trying!
  2. Only one person may register at a time. Two individuals in the same household must register and pay separately.
  3. If you choose a class which is filled, you may sign up to be placed on a wait list. FIRST, however, you must register and pay for an open class. People on a wait list will be admitted as space is available in the order of their registration.
  4. PRINT A COPY OF YOUR CLASSES. After you complete the payment page of the registration process, you can click the "Print" button on that page to make a copy of your classes. Additionally, you will receive an email with your classes. Please save it! PLEASE NOTE LATE START DATES AND EARLY END DATES.
411

Biotechnology and Society

This course introduces basic concepts of biology to students who are interested in biotechnology. This is an introduction to the scientific principles and techniques of molecular biology and biotechnology, including recombinant DNA technology and gene cloning, recombinant protein production and analysis of biomolecules. Discussion of technical, ethical and safety concerns presented by medical, agricultural, pharmaceutical and forensic applications of biotechnology.

Instructor: Ralph Sinibaldi, PhD
Monday: 1/7 - 2/25, 9:00-11:00 Conference Room
3/18 Max
412

Women’s Money Matters

Nine out of ten women will be solely responsible for their finances and 62% of them are afraid their money won’t last their lifetime.  This course will show you where you stand today, help you identify your goals and give you a plan on how to get there. Topics include Financial Planning, Legacy Planning, Psychology of Money, Investing 101, Understanding Insurance Needs, Social Security and Medicare.

Instructor: Reesa Manning
Monday: 1/7 - 2/25, 11:30-1:30, Room 2
27/40 Max
413

Writing Your Life Story

Have you thought about writing some of your life memories and possibly compiling  them into a memoir? This class will provide the prompts to unlock those memories. Each class member will be expected to write and share a personal memory to be critiqued weekly in a group. The collaborative, informal structure of this class offers encouragement to recall in written form the memories from your life. Class limited to 18 and no admissions after the first class due to the required confidentiality.

Instructor: Chris Considine; Karen Harvey
Monday: 1/7 - 2/25, 2:00-4:00, Conference Room
3/18 Max
414

Hot News/Hot Views

We live in a world where news-making issues come up daily. Take the opportunity to discuss breaking local, state, national and international news with curious and knowledgeable colleagues. The facilitator will select topics from current events and provide background information.

Instructor: John Considine
Monday: 1/7 - 2/25, 2:00-4:00, Room 2
0/40 Max
415

Intermediate Spanish

This course will concentrate on everyday/travel conversational Spanish. It is not a beginner's course. Some Spanish is helpful. The textbook is "Spanish Conversation Premium, 2nd Edition, Comprehensive by Jean Yates, PhD. It is available on Amazon. We will be doing some work with verb conjugation and vocabulary.

Instructor: Angelica Miller
Tuesday: 1/8 - 2/26, 9:00-11:00, Conference Room
0/18 Max
416

Entertainment Classics

If you like comedy, drama, and music then come spend two hours a week viewing some wonderful videos and films from my collection. Many of the selections are rare and you will get the interesting back-story on each of them. Selections are taken from television, Broadway, concerts, and film.

Instructor: Gerald Salomon
Tuesday: 1/8 - 2/26, 9:00-11:00, Room 1
33/80 Max
418

Opera for All!

Whether you've been humming arias since you were 12 or you have no idea what an aria is....THIS OPERA CLASS IS FOR YOU! We will hear a wide range of operatic presentations, including complete performances, individual scenes and arias. The class is designed to appeal to everyone, regardless of their familiarity with the subject. Using my large collection of DVD's and CD's, we will view and listen to familiar and unfamiliar performers in a variety of roles. When we're through with this class, you may be humming arias and demanding encores, but if so, please wait until you're out of earshot of the wonderful COD staff in the office area.

Instructor: Gerald Salomon
Tuesday: 1/8 - 2/26, 11:30-1:30, Room 2
10/40 Max
419

Evidence vs Emotion—A Current Events Class

This dynamic class challenges the way we shape our positions on current political, social and economic issues. We examine the objective EVIDENCE from reliable sources and observe the effect of EMOTION in reaching our decisions. It's Facts vs Fiction - Observable Data vs Opinion - Head vs Heart - Evidence vs Emotion.

Instructor: Jerry Blatt
Tuesday: 1/8 - 2/26, 11:30-1:30, Room 1
26/80 Max
421

Vamos a Charlar

This continuing class is designed for the person who already has a solid vocabulary in Spanish and a firm foundation in grammar, including all verb tenses and the subjunctive.  Participants are expected to be able to converse extemporaneously.  Our emphasis is conversation, though we will also review grammar and have written assignments.  Class size is limited to 16 students.  The text we will use is "The Ultimate Spanish Review and Practice", premium third edition, by Ronni Gordon and David Stillman.  This text is available through Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

Instructor: Les Modie
Tuesday: 1/8 - 2/26, 2:00-4:00, Conference Room
5/16 Max
422

Great Literature

We will discuss short fiction found in "The Best American Short Stories--2018" (eds., Roxane Gay with Heidi Pitlor). The text can be purchased at Amazon.com (ISBN#: 978-0-544-58294-1). It will be used in the Winter and Spring terms. Participants should read and be prepared to discuss for the first class Alicia Elliot's "Unearth" pp. 76-82.

Instructor: Harold Jacobs, PhD
Tuesday: 1/8 - 2/26, 2:00-4:00, Room 2
-3/40 Max
423

Dark Alleys & Dangerous Blondes: A Look at Film Noir

Film Noir is a unique contribution by American films to the world catalog of the many kinds of stories told in movies. The skeptical private detective, the gorgeous woman with a past, goons & thugs who threaten both of them, a way out. Maybe. Our third semester will include films from the classic era; some are famous and others not so well known.  We will see Night and the City, Angel Face, Double Indemnity, Born to Kill, and others.  A few surprises are in store.  Stay alert.  You don't know what is in the dark alley.  

Instructor: John Curran
Tuesday: 1/8 - 2/26, 2:00-4:30, Room 1
-1/80 Max
417

Economics in the News

We will discuss current economic topics in the news so as to understand the truth behind the rhetoric. Please bring in topics that you would like to discuss so we can make it an interactive class.

Instructor: Donald Kagan
Tuesday: 1/15 - 2/26, 9:00-11:00, Room 2 NOTE Start Date
20/40 Max
420

Being Your Own Best Healthcare Advocate

Being Your Own Best Healthcare Advocate This class will discuss how to get the most out of your healthcare and ideas on how to deal with chronic health issues. We will discuss Health Care Directives, how to prepare for doctor visits, researching your disease, and how to improve hospital stays.

Instructor: Donald Kagan
Tuesday: 1/15 - 2/26, 11:30-1:30, Conference Room NOTE Start Date
7/18 Max
431

Intermediate Genealogy (5 Weeks)

Are you ready to take your genealogical research to the next level? Join us as we learn more about how each part of the genealogical proof standard helps us improve our research and solves each research problem that we have.  We will look at what a reasonable exhaustive search is, how to craft source citations to guide us, how to analyze and compare our information, how to resolve conflicts in our data and how to write statements supporting our answer. We will use your own genealogical research and problems to work on!

Instructor: Gary Fredricksen
Wednesday: 1/9 - 2/6, 2:00-4:00, Conference Room
0/18 Max
424

French Conversations

This is a French conversation course for those who would like to brush up on their rusty conversational skills, become more fluent and improve their pronunciation. It is a great opportunity to practice what you have learned in the past. THIS IS NOT A GRAMMAR COURSE OR A BEGINNER LEVEL CLASS.

Instructor: Liliane Bazerghi-Fymat
Wednesday: 1/9 - 2/27, 9:00-11:00, Conference Room
0/18 Max
425

Great Trials

In this class we examine historical and fictional trials through a combination of lecture and multimedia presentations.

Instructor: Steve Moyer, J.D.
Wednesday: 1/9 - 2/27, 9:00-11:45, Room 1
20/80 Max
426

Mr. President

This challenging class combines history and current events. Each session will explore the personal and political life of a previous American president including strengths, weaknesses and historical accomplishments. We will examine famous quotes, trivia, and relevant facts to fantasize what he would do if president today.  This session will focus on Founding Fathers Jefferson, Adams, Madison and Monroe.

Instructor: Jerry Blatt
Wednesday: 1/9 - 2/27, 9:00-11:00, Room 2
22/40 Max
427

Beginning Spanish

This is a beginning Spanish course intended for those who have had little or no exposure to Spanish as well as those who may have studied it previously but need extensive review.  The approach will be conversational in nature, with emphasis on vocabulary acquisition and mastery of verbs and basic grammatical structures needed for conversation. As evidenced by the interests of a majority of class members (e.g. Spanish for travel, or necessity of interaction with gardeners or housekeepers), the text may be supplemented by additional vocabulary and conversational worksheets. Above all, learning a new language should be fun, and that is one of my goals! We will be using the text “Ultimate Spanish Beginner-Intermediate (Coursebook)” by Living Language which is available from Amazon with both new and used prices and free shipping for Prime members.

Instructor: Angelica Miller
Wednesday: 1/9 - 2/27, 10:00-11:30 Room 4
0/18 Max
428

Improvisation: Acting for the Fun of It

You know you want it. You’ve seen others do it. You’ve thought, “Gee, I’d like to try that!” Join us at Drama Games and surprise yourself with talents you never knew you had, in addition to learning the basics of stage logistics. Each class is designed to keep your mind and body sharp by strengthening and restoring oxygenated blood flow. You’ll think as you finish your first class, “I can’t remember when I laughed that hard.” There is no text needed for this class, but you are welcome to buy any of my published works upon request. These games are great for entertaining at parties too!  So, come outside and play. You deserve it.

Instructor: Michele M Miller
Wednesday: 1/9 - 2/27, 11:30-1:30, Conference Room
0/18 Max
429

Ted Talks

This class will present videos of Ted Talks on topics of special interest, leading to interesting class discussions. The talks will stimulate analysis and sharing of ideas, offering "food for the mind and soul, new discoveries and uplifting subjects." The goal is to introduce new ideas and discover new concepts.

Instructor: Liliane Bazerghi-Fymat
Wednesday: 1/9 - 2/27, 11:30-1:30PM, Room 2
0/40 Max
430

Post-Neorealism: Fellini, Antonioni, Pasolini, and More

POST-NEOREALISM builds upon the principles in FILM APPRECIATION I and FILM APPRECIATION II.  Previous students are encouraged to return, and new students are encouraged to jump in.

Italian neorealism--among the most influential film movements of all time--dominated Italian cinema from 1945 to 1954, growing organically as its writers and directors found social and human meanings from the Italian war experience and the Italian streets. Yet in the subsequent twenty years, neorealism experienced a surprising transformation into something more complex and exceedingly personal, as great directors created unique, groundbreaking films which extended forever the artistic boundaries of cinema. This course will study the careers of Cesare Zavattini, Vittorio De Sica, Roberto Rossellini, Federico Fellini, Michelangelo Antonioni, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Luchino Visconti, Bernardo Bertolucci, and Lina Wertmuller.  We will screen film clips to demonstrate their work, as well as seven features considered the consummate masterpieces of this period. Many of these thought-provoking and visually stunning features are among the instructor’s all-time favorite films and deal with issues of sex, politics, social justice, and the inherent alienation within modern culture.

Instructor: Charles Derry, PhD
Wednesday: 1/9 - 2/27, 1:00-4:30, Room 1
33/80 Max
432

Art Appreciation

This course introduces the history of Impressionism. We will examine the artists, from Manet, Monet, and Renoir in Argenteuil to Pissarro and Cézanne at Pontoise. We will explore the impact of women Impressionists such as Cassatt & Morisot, and Post-Impressionism: Van Gogh, Gauguin. Presentations are augmented by audio and visual materials.

Instructor:
Wednesday: 2/6 - 2/27, 2:00-4:00, Room 2 NOTE START DATE
0/40 Max
438

Obama, A Retrospective

Ten years after the inauguration of the 44th President, we will examine Barack Obama’s character, accomplishments, weaknesses and impact on America.

Instructor: Jerry Blatt
Thursday: 1/10 - 1/10, 12:00-2:00, Room 1 (One Class Meeting)
52/80 Max
433

Anatomy of a Trial

A nationally known trial lawyer takes you inside the process and decisions that went into the trial of one of his major jury trials.  You will hear his thoughts on why he took the case (based upon a few seconds of a video), how and why he prepared the case the way he did, the kind of jurors he wanted and why, the direct and cross examinations of the witnesses (you will be provided with their depositions and trial transcripts for review if you choose) and the theory behind and why he elected to give the opening and closing statements actually given at the trial.  At the conclusion of the course, you will be given the jury’s verdict; all interspersed with the illustrative “war stories” of a lawyer who spent nearly 45 years trying a myriad of cases from first degree murder to multiple multi-million dollar securities fraud cases from New York to LA and Seattle to Miami. (Class limited to 15)

Instructor: Gary Ceriani, J.D.
Thursday: 1/10 - 2/28, 9:00-11:00, Conference Room
-1/15 Max
434

History and Everyday America

Movies, TV, advertising, fashion, literature, music, architecture, and sports are but a few examples of historical evidence available for studying the lives of Americans during the past century. Each week we will examine and discuss aspects of popular culture to see how such evidence might recreate, reflect, make history, and help measure change in the nation’s past.

Instructor: Thomas Jones, PhD
Thursday: 1/10 - 2/28, 9:00-11:00 Room 1
33/80 Max
436

Short Stories

The class will use: The Art of the  Short Story, Dana Gioia, R.S. Gwynn (Editors).   It may be purchased on Amazon Books: Paperback -ISBN-13:978-0321363633,ISBN-10:0321363639. Join us to discuss some of the greatest short stories ever written. All participants will be expected to lead a discussion. Please read "A Rose for Emily" by William Faulkner, pages 238-245, for the first class.

Instructor: Adair Fell; Nancy Dowling
Thursday: 1/10 - 2/28, 11:30-1:30, Conference Room
0/18 Max
437

Photoshop Essentials

Have you ever wondered what it means to "Photoshop" a photograph? Or maybe you went all out and purchased Adobe Photoshop for your computer. This course will help guide you through some of the program's essentials.

We'll explore concepts like Making a Selection, Layers, Layer Masks, Tonal Adjustments, Layer Adjustments, Color Adjustments, Retouching Essentials, Tips & Tricks. Time permitting, we'll get into some of the more advanced features. Bring your laptop with Photoshop loaded, take notes, or take advantage of the class materials that will be provided. Either way, this class will give you the tools to make your friends and family think you've gone pro!

Instructor: Harry Nugent-Patten
Thursday: 1/10 - 2/28, 11:30-1:30, Room 2
22/40 Max
440

Bulls Bears and Pigs

Each week we will discuss developments in the stock, bond, and related markets. Over the course of the term, we will exchange ideas about a wide range of investing topics: information sources, investment vehicles (etf's, cef's,options, etc), where to trade,how to trade, etc.  Students are invited to present their own investment stories and ideas.   Previous investment experience is a plus.

Whether you invest on your own or through an advisor, this course should help you become more knowledgeable of what is being done with your money.

Instructor: Jim Miller
Thursday: 1/10 - 2/28, 2:00-4:00, Room 1
58/80 Max
435

Be a Better Photographer

Open to all levels of photographers. Each week, participants will have an opportunity to take and submit photos by email that encourage experimentation with composition, lighting, perspective, etc. Participants can use phones or cameras to take photos. Observers who do not wish to submit photos are also welcome to attend and learn from others.

Instructor: Marc Rosen
Thursday: 1/17 - 2/28, 9:30-11:00, Room 2 (Note start date)
13/40 Max
439

Controversial Issues

We will discuss and debate contemporary issues that are both controversial and familiar. Brief presentations by the facilitator and volunteers will stimulate fact-based, informative exchanges. The facilitator will ensure that all sides and viewpoints are heard and considered. (Similar classes are: Hot News/Hot Views, Global Economics, Evidence vs Emotion)

Instructor: Marc Rosen
Thursday: 1/17 - 2/28, 11:30-1:30, Room 1 NOTE Start Date
0/80 Max